We can see that the Lord is called the Holy One of Israel from the following passages.

The angel said to Mary, “The Holy One that is born from you will be called the Son of God.” (Luke 1:35)

I saw in visions, and behold, a Watcher, a Holy One, coming down from heaven. (Daniel 4:13, 23)

God will come from Teman and the Holy One from Mount Paran. (Habakkuk 3:3)

[Thus says Jehovah, the Holy One of Israel, and Israel’s Maker.] (Isaiah 45:11)

Thus says Jehovah, the Redeemer of Israel, Israel’s Holy One. (Isaiah 49:7)

I am Jehovah your God, the Holy One of Israel, your Savior. (Isaiah 43:1, 3)

As for our Redeemer, Jehovah Sabaoth is his name, the Holy One of Israel. (Isaiah 47:4)

Thus says Jehovah your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel. (Isaiah 43:14; 48:17)

Jehovah Sabaoth is his name, and your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel. (Isaiah 54:5)

They tested God and the Holy One of Israel. (Psalms 78:41)

They have abandoned Jehovah and have angered the Holy One of Israel. (Isaiah 1:4)

They said, “Make the Holy One of Israel cease from our presence.” Therefore thus said the Holy One of Israel . . . (Isaiah 30:11, 12)

. . . those who say, “Let him hasten his work so that we may see; let the counsel of the Holy One of Israel draw near and arrive.” (Isaiah 5:19)

On that day they will rely on Jehovah, the Holy One of Israel, in truth. (Isaiah 10:20)

Shout and rejoice, daughter of Zion, because the Holy One of Israel is great in your midst. (Isaiah 12:6)

The God of Israel has said, “On that day people will look back to their Maker, and their eyes will look toward the Holy One of Israel.” (Isaiah 17:7)

The meek will increase their joy in Jehovah, and the poor of the people will rejoice in the Holy One of Israel. (Isaiah 29:19; 41:16)

Nations will run to you because of Jehovah your God and because of the Holy One of Israel. (Isaiah 55:5)

The islands will trust in me to bring your children from afar for the name of Jehovah Sabaoth and the Holy One of Israel. (Isaiah 60:9)

Their land is full of sin against the Holy One of Israel. (Jeremiah 51:5)

There are many other instances elsewhere.

The Holy One of Israel means the Lord in his divine human nature, since the angel Gabriel said to Mary, “The Holy One that is born from you will be called the Son of God” (Luke 1:35). As for Jehovah and the Holy One of Israel being one and the same even though they are given different names, this is quite clear from the passages just cited where it says that Jehovah is the Holy One of Israel.

from The Lord, Section 40

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We can see that the Lord is called “the God of Israel” and “the God of Jacob” from the following passages:

Moses took the blood and sprinkled it on the people and said, “This is the blood of the covenant that Jehovah has made with you.” And they saw the God of Israel, under whose feet there was something like a work of sapphire stone and like the substance of heaven. (Exodus 24:8, 9, 10)

The crowds were amazed when they saw the mute speaking, the lame walking, and the blind seeing; and they glorified the God of Israel. (Matthew 15:31)

Blessed is the Lord God of Israel, because he has visited and freed his people Israel, when he raised up the horn of our salvation in the house of David. (Luke 1:68, 69)

I will give you treasures of darkness and the hidden wealth of secret places so that you may recognize that I, Jehovah, who have called you by your name, am the God of Israel. (Isaiah 45:3)

. . . the house of Jacob, people who swear by the name of Jehovah and of the God of Israel, for they are called by the name of the holy city and rely on the God of Israel: Jehovah Sabaoth is his name. (Isaiah 48:1, 2)

Jacob will see his descendants in his midst. They will sanctify my name and will sanctify the Holy One of Jacob; and they will fear the God of Israel. (Isaiah 29:23)

In the very last of days many people will come and say, “Come, and let us go up to the mountain of Jehovah, to the house of the God of Jacob, who will teach us about his ways so that we may walk in his paths.” (Isaiah 2:3; Micah 4:2)

. . . so that all flesh may know that I, Jehovah, am your Savior, and your Redeemer, the Mighty One of Jacob. (Isaiah 49:26)

I, Jehovah, am your Savior and your Redeemer, the Powerful One of Jacob. (Isaiah 60:16)

In the presence of the Lord you give birth, O earth, in the presence of the God of Jacob. (Psalms 114:7)

David swore to Jehovah and made a vow to the Mighty One of Jacob, “[God forbid] that I enter the tent of my home until I have found a place for Jehovah, a dwelling for the Mighty One of Jacob.” We have heard of him in Ephrata [that is, Bethlehem]. (Psalms 132:2, 3, 5, 6)

Blessed be the God of Israel; the whole earth will be full of his glory. (Psalms 72:18, 19)

There are also many other passages where the Lord is called “God of Israel,” “Redeemer,” and “Savior,” such as Luke 1:47; Isaiah 45:15; 54:5; Psalms 78:35; plus many other places where we find only “the God of Israel,” as in Isaiah 17:6; 21:10, 17; 24:15; 29:23; Jeremiah 7:3; 9:15; 11:3; 13:12; 16:9; 19:3, 15; 23:2; 24:5; 25:15, 27; 29:4, 8, 21, 25; 30:2; 31:23; 32:14, 15, 36; 33:4; 34:2, 13; 35:13, 17, 18, 19; 37:7; 38:17; 39:16; 42:9, 15, 18; 43:10; 44:2, 7, 11, 25; 48:1; 50:18; 51:33; Ezekiel 8:4; 9:3; 10:19, 20; 11:22; 43:2; 44:2; Zephaniah 2:9; Psalms 41:13; 59:5; 68:8.

from The Lord, Section 39

We can see from the following passages that the Lord is called “Jehovah” (Continued)

In these passages, Jehovah is called Redeemer and Savior; and since the Lord alone is Redeemer and Savior, it is he who is meant by “Jehovah.”

We can also see that the Lord is Jehovah—that is, that Jehovah is the Lord—from the following passages.

A shoot [will go forth] from the trunk of Jesse, and a sprout from its roots will bear fruit. The spirit of Jehovah will rest upon him. (Isaiah 11:1, 2)

It will be said on that day, “Behold, this is our God; we have waited for him to set us free. [This is] Jehovah; we have waited for him. Let us rejoice and be glad in his salvation.” (Isaiah 25:9)

A voice of someone in the wilderness crying out, “Prepare a pathway for Jehovah; make level in the desert a highway for our God.” The glory of Jehovah will be revealed, and all flesh will see it. Behold, the Lord Jehovih is coming in strength, and his arm will rule for him. (Isaiah 40:3, 5, 10)

I am Jehovah. I will make you a covenant for the people, a light for the nations. I am Jehovah. This is my name, and I will not give my glory to another. (Isaiah 42:6, 7, 8)

Behold, the days [are coming] when I will raise up for David a righteous branch who will rule as king, and prosper, and bring about judgment and justice on earth. And this is his name: they will call him “Jehovah our Righteousness.” (Jeremiah 23:5, 6; 33:15, 16)

As for you, Bethlehem Ephrata, one will come forth from you for me who will become the ruler in Israel. He will stand firm and feed [his flock] in the strength of Jehovah. (Micah 5:2, 4)

A Child has been born to us; a Son has been given to us. Leadership is upon his shoulder; and his name will be called God, Hero, Father of Eternity, on the throne of David, to establish and found it in judgment and in justice, from now on, even to eternity. (Isaiah 9:6, 7)

Jehovah will go forth and fight against the nations, and his feet will stand on the Mount of Olives, which faces Jerusalem. (Zechariah 14:3, 4)

Lift your heads, gates, and be raised up, doors of the world, so that the King of Glory may come in! Who is this King of Glory? Jehovah, strong and heroic, Jehovah, a hero in war. (Psalms 24:7–10)

On that day Jehovah Sabaoth will become an ornate crown and a beautiful diadem for the remnant of his people. (Isaiah 28:5)

I will send you Elijah the prophet before the great day of Jehovah comes. (Malachi 4:5)

There are other passages as well where it says that the day of Jehovah is great and near, like Ezekiel 30:3; Joel 2:11; Amos 5:18, 20; and Zephaniah 1:7, 14, 15, 18.

from The Lord, Section 38

We can see from the following passages that the Lord is called “Jehovah”

Thus says Jehovah, who is your Creator, O Jacob, and your Maker, O Israel: “I have redeemed you. I am Jehovah your God, the Holy One of Israel, your Savior.” (Isaiah 43:1, 3)

[Thus says Jehovah, the Holy One of Israel, and Israel’s Maker . . . Surely you are a hidden God, O God of Israel, the Savior.] (Isaiah 45:11, 15)

. . . so that all flesh may know that I, Jehovah, am your Savior, and your Redeemer, the Mighty One of Jacob. (Isaiah 49:26)

. . . so that you may know that I, Jehovah, am your Savior and your Redeemer, the Powerful One of Jacob. (Isaiah 60:16)

. . . Jehovah, the one who formed you from the womb. (Isaiah 49:5)

. . . Jehovah, my rock and my Redeemer. (Psalms 19:14)

Thus says Jehovah your Maker and the one who formed you from the womb. Thus says Jehovah, the King of Israel, and Israel’s Redeemer, Jehovah Sabaoth. (Isaiah 44:2, 6)

As for our Redeemer, Jehovah Sabaoth is his name, the Holy One of Israel. (Isaiah 47:4)

“With everlasting compassion I will have mercy [on you],” says Jehovah, your Redeemer. (Isaiah 54:8)

Their Redeemer is strong; Jehovah is his name. (Jeremiah 50:34)

Jehovah God is my rock, my fortress, the horn of my salvation, my Savior. (2 Samuel 22:2, 3)

Thus says Jehovah your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel. (Isaiah 43:14; 48:17)

Thus says Jehovah, the Redeemer of Israel, Israel’s Holy One: “Monarchs will see . . .” (Isaiah 49:7)

I am Jehovah, and there is no Savior other than me. (Isaiah 43:11)

Am I not Jehovah? And there is no [God] other than me; and there is no Savior other than me. Look to me so that you may be saved, all you ends of the earth. (Isaiah 45:21, 22)

I am Jehovah your God; there is no Savior other than me. (Hosea 13:4)

You have redeemed me, O Jehovah of truth. (Psalms 31:5)

Let Israel hope in Jehovah, for with Jehovah there is mercy; with him there is abundant redemption. He will redeem Israel from all his iniquities. (Psalms 130:7, 8)

Jehovah Sabaoth is his name, and your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel. He will be called the God of the whole earth. (Isaiah 54:5)

from The Lord, Section 38

The Lord Existed Before His Coming into This World

We can also see from the Lord’s words in the Gospels that he existed before Abraham [John 8:58], that he had glory with the Father before the foundation of the world [John 17:5; 17:24], that he came forth from the Father [John 16:28], that the Word was with God from the beginning and that the Word was God [John 1:1], and that the Word became flesh [John 1:14].

The passages that follow will serve to show that the Lord is called Jehovah, the God of Israel and of Jacob, the Holy One of Israel, God, and the Lord, as well as King, Jehovah’s Anointed, and David.

from The Lord, Section 37

Notes: (These verses are from today’s bible New Living Transalation)

Jesus answered, “I tell you the truth, before Abraham was even born, I am!” (John 8:58)

Now, Father, bring me into the glory we shared before the world began. (John 17:5)

Father, I want these whom you have given me to be with me where I am. Then they can see all the glory you gave me because you loved me even before the world began! (John 17:24)

Yes, I came from the Father into the world, and now I will leave the world and return to the Father.” (John 16:28)

In the beginning the Word already existed.
The Word was with God,
and the Word was God. (John 1:1)

So the Word became human and made his home among us. He was full of unfailing love and faithfulness. And we have seen his glory, the glory of the Father’s one and only Son. (John 1:14)

The Lord Is God Himself, the Source and Subject of the Word

In the first chapter [Sections 1–7] I undertook to show that the whole of Sacred Scripture is about the Lord and that the Lord is the Word. At this point I need to set this forth further with passages from the Word where the Lord is called Jehovah, the God of Israel and Jacob, the Holy One of Israel, Lord, and God, as well as King, Jehovah’s Anointed, and David.

By way of preface I may observe that I have been granted the opportunity to read through all the prophets and the Psalms, to reflect on the individual verses and see what they were about; and it became clear that they were about nothing but the church that had been established and was to be established by the Lord, about the Lord’s Coming, his battles, glorification, redemption, and salvation and about the heaven that comes from him, together with their opposites. Since these are all works of the Lord, I could see that the whole of Sacred Scripture is about the Lord and that therefore the Lord is the Word.

The only people who can see this, though, are the ones who enjoy enlightenment from the Lord and who are also acquainted with the Word’s spiritual meaning. All the angels in heaven are aware of this meaning, so when one of us is reading the Word, that and that alone is what they grasp. There are always angels and spirits with us, and since they are spiritual beings, they understand spiritually what we understand in earthly terms.

From the passages cited earlier, in the first chapter (Sections 1–7), we can see only dimly, as though through a screen, that the whole of Sacred Scripture is about the Lord. The passages about the Lord now to be cited show that he is often called “Lord” and “God.” It may be very clear from this that he is the one who spoke through the prophets, in whose books it says again and again, “Jehovah spoke,” “Jehovah said,” and “the saying of Jehovah.”

We can see that the Lord existed before his coming into the world from the following passages:

John the Baptist said of the Lord, “This is the one who is to come after me, who was before me; I am not worthy to undo the strap of his sandal.” And “This is the one of whom I said, ‘One is coming after me, who was before me and was greater than me.’” (John 1:27, 30)

In the Book of Revelation:

[The elders] fell down before the throne on which the Lord was, saying, “We give you thanks, O Lord God Almighty, who is and who was and who is to come.” (Revelation 11:16, 17)

In Micah:

As for you, Bethlehem Ephrata, as little as you are among the thousands of Judah, one will come forth from you for me who will become the ruler in Israel; his coming forth is from ancient times, from the days of eternity. (Micah 5:2)

from The Lord, Section 37

Genesis 1:4-5 and Its Inner Meaning

And God saw the light, that it was good, and God made a distinction between light and darkness. And God called the light day, and the darkness he called night. — Genesis 1:4-5

The light is said to be good because it is from the Lord, who is goodness itself.

The darkness is whatever looked like light to us before our new conception and birth, because we saw evil as good and falsity as truth; but it is actually darkness—our lingering sense of self-sufficiency.

Absolutely everything that is the Lord’s is compared to the day, because it belongs to the light, and everything that is our own is compared to the night, because it belongs to the darkness. The Word draws this comparison in quite a few places.

from Secrets of Heaven, Volime 1, Section 21

Genesis 1:3 and Its Inner Meaning

And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. — Genesis 1:3

The first step is taken when we begin to realize that goodness and truth are something transcendent.

People who focus exclusively on externals do not even know what is good or what is true; everything connected with self-love and love of worldly advantages they consider good, and anything that promotes those two loves they consider true.

They are unaware that such “goodness” is evil and such “truth” false. When we are conceived anew, however, we first begin to be aware that our “good” is not good. And as we advance further into the light, it dawns on us that the Lord exists and that he is goodness and truth itself.

The Lord says in John that we need to know of his existence:

Unless you believe that I am, you will die in your sins. (John 8:24)

We need to know too that the Lord is goodness itself, or life, and truth itself, or light, and consequently that nothing good or true exists that does not come from him.

This is also found in John:

In the beginning there was the Word, and the Word was present with God, and the Word was God. Everything was made by him, and nothing that was made was made without him. In him was life, and the life was the light of humankind; but the light appears in the darkness. He was the true light that shines on every person coming into the world. (John 1:1, 3, 4, [5,] 9)

from Secrets of Heaven, Volume 1, Section 20

The Word (Scripture) has Four Major Modes of Writing

1. The mode of [the people in] the earliest church.

Their method of expressing themselves involved thought of the spiritual and heavenly things represented by the earthly, mundane objects they mentioned. Not only did they express themselves in words representing higher things, they also spun those words into a kind of narrative thread to lend them greater life. This practice gave the earliest people the fullest pleasure possible.

This early manner of writing is meant in Hannah’s prophecy:

“Speak deeply, deeply; let what is ancient come out of your mouth” (1 Samuel 2:3).

David calls those representative signs

“enigmas from ancient times” (Psalms 78:2, 3, 4)

Moses received the present accounts of creation and the Garden of Eden, extending up to the time of Abram, from the descendants of the earliest church.

2. The narrative mode.

This mode is used in the books of Moses from Abram’s story on, and in Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings. The historical events in these books are exactly what they appear to be in the literal sense, but as a whole and in detail they still contain an entirely different meaning on the inner plane. What follows will, with the Lord’s divine mercy, explain that meaning in order.

3. The prophetic mode.

The inspiration for this was the mode used by the earliest church, a manner of writing [the authors] revered. But the prophetic mode lacks the cohesiveness and semi-historical quality of the earliest church’s mode. It is choppy, and almost completely unintelligible except on the inner level, which holds profound secrets forming a well-connected chain of ideas. They deal with our outer and inner beings, the many stages of the church, heaven itself, and—at the very core—the Lord.

4. David’s Psalms.

This mode is midway between the prophetic mode and people’s usual way of speaking. The inner meaning speaks of the Lord under the character of David when he was king.

from Secrets of Heaven, Volume 1, section 66

The Word’s Inner Meaning

This, then, is the Word’s inner meaning, the true and genuine life in it, which does not reveal itself at all in the literal meaning. But the number of secrets hidden within is so large that volumes would fail to unfold all of them. I have offered just a few, of a type confirming that regeneration is the theme and that it progresses from outer to inner self.

That is what angels see in the Word. They know nothing whatever of the literal contents, or the most obvious meaning of even one word, still less the names of different lands, cities, rivers, and people that come up so frequently in the narrative and prophetic parts. All they picture are the things those words and names symbolize.

Adam in Paradise, for instance, brings the earliest church to their minds—and not even the church itself but its belief in the Lord.

Noah brings up the picture of that church’s remnant among its successors, lasting up to Abram’s time.

Abraham never makes them think of a man who lived long ago but of a saving faith, which he represented. And so on.

In sum, they see spiritual and heavenly realities in the Word, completely separate from the words and names.

Several people found themselves carried up into heaven’s outermost entry hall while I was reading the Word, and they spoke to me from there. They said that they had no inkling of a single word or letter there but saw only the things symbolized on the next deeper level of meaning.

These things, according to their description, were so beautiful, followed in such a perfect sequence, and affected them so deeply that they called it glory.

from Secrets of Heaven, Volume 1, Sections 64-65