Divinity Is not in Space

Given the divine omnipresence—presence with everyone in the world, with every angel in heaven, and with every spirit under heaven—there is no way a merely physical image can compass the thought that Divinity, or God, is not in space. Only a spiritual image will suffice. Physical images are inadequate because they involve space. They are put together out of earthly things, and there is something spatial about absolutely every earthly thing we see with our eyes. Everything that is large or small here involves space, everything that is long or wide or high here involves space—in a word, every measurement, every shape, every form here involves space. This is why I said that a merely physical image cannot compass the fact that Divinity is not in space when the claim is made that it is everywhere.

Still, we can grasp this with our earthly thinking if only we let in a little spiritual light. This requires that I first say something about spiritual concepts and the spiritual thinking that arises from them. Spiritual concepts have nothing to do with space. They have to do solely with state, state being an attribute of love, life, wisdom, desires, and the delights they provide—in general, an attribute of what is good and true. A truly spiritual concept of these realities has nothing in common with space. It is higher and looks down on spatial concepts the way heaven looks down on earth.

However, since angels and spirits see with their eyes the way we do on earth, and since objects can be seen only in space, there does seem to be space in the spiritual world where angels and spirits are, space like ours on earth. Still, it is not space but an appearance of space. It is not fixed and invariant like ours. It can be lengthened and shortened, changed and altered; and since it cannot be defined by measurement, we here cannot grasp it with an earthly concept, but only with a spiritual one. Spiritual concepts are no different when they apply to spatial distances than when they apply to “distances” of what is good and “distances” of what is true, which are agreements and likenesses as to state.

from Divine Love and Wisdom, Section 7

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We Are Life-Receivers, not Life

If this is to be intelligible, though, it is essential to realize that the Lord, being love in its very essence or divine love, is visible to angels in heaven as a sun; that warmth and light flow from that sun; that the outflowing warmth is essentially love and the outflowing light essentially wisdom; and that to the extent that angels are receptive of that spiritual warmth and spiritual light, they themselves are instances of love and wisdom—instances of love and wisdom not on their own, but from the Lord.

Spiritual warmth and spiritual light flow into and affect not only angels but also us, precisely to the extent that we become receptive. Our receptivity develops in proportion to our love for the Lord and our love for our neighbor.

That sun itself, or divine love, cannot use its warmth and light to create anyone directly from itself. If it did, the creature would be love in its essence, which is the Lord himself. It can, however, create people out of material substances so formed as to be receptive of its actual warmth and light. In the same way, the sun of our world cannot use its warmth and light to bring forth sprouts in the earth directly. Rather, the sun uses substances in the soil in which it can be present through its warmth and light to make plants grow. (On the Lord’s divine love being seen as the sun in the spiritual world, with spiritual warmth and light flowing from it, giving angels their love and wisdom, see Heaven and Hell 116–142.)

Since we are life-receivers, not life, it follows that our conception from our parents is not the conception of life but simply the conception of the first and purest forms that can accept life. These forms serve as a nucleus or beginning in the womb, to which are added, step by step, material substances in forms suited, in their various patterns and levels, to the reception of life.

from Divine Love and Wisdom, Sections 5, 6

Notes:

Sections 116-140 from Heaven and Hell: Published 11/15/2016-12/2/2016
Sections 141-142 from Heaven and Hell: Published 7/8/2-17/9/2017

7. In this way, God became human on both the first [or innermost] level and the last [or outermost] level.

It is explained at some length in Heaven and Hell [Sections 78–86] that God is human and that because of God all angels and spirits are human, and there will be more on this topic in the books about angelic wisdom.

While from the beginning God was human on the first [or innermost] level, he was not yet human on the last [or outermost] level. After he took on a human nature in the world, though, he also became human on the last [or outermost] level. This follows from what has been shown above [Sections 29–35], namely, that the Lord united his human nature with his divine nature and in this way made his human nature divine as well.

That is why the Lord is called the Beginning and the End, the First and the Last, and the Alpha and the Omega. This is in the Book of Revelation:

“I am the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the End,” says the Lord, “who is and who was and who is to come, the Almighty.” (Revelation 1:8, 11)

When John saw the Son of Humanity in the midst of the seven lampstands,

[John] fell at his feet as dead, but [the Son of Humanity] laid his right hand on him, saying, “I am the First and the Last.” (Revelation 1:13, 17; 2:8; 21:6)

Behold, I am coming quickly, to give to all according to what they have done. I am the Alpha and the Omega, the Beginning and the End, the First and the Last. (Revelation 22:12, 13)

And in Isaiah,

Thus says Jehovah the King of Israel, and Israel’s Redeemer, Jehovah Sabaoth: “I am the First and the Last.” (Isaiah 44:6; 48:12)

from The Lord, Section 36

Notes:

Sections 78-86 from Heaven and Hell: Published 3/28/2018-3/30/2018

Sections 29-35 from The Lord: Published 3/31/2018-4/7/2018

6. Step by step he took off the human nature he had taken on from his mother and put on a human nature from what was divine within him, which is the divine human nature and the Son of God. (Continued)

As for his taking off the human nature received from his mother and putting on the human nature received from what was divine within him called “the Father,” this we can see from the fact that whenever the Lord spoke directly to his mother he did not call her “mother” but “woman.” We find only three places in the Gospels where he speaks directly to his mother or about her, and in two of these he called her “woman,” while in one he did not acknowledge her as his mother. As for the two in which he called her “woman,” we read in John,

Jesus’ mother said to him, “They have no wine.” Jesus said to her, “What have I to do with you, woman? My hour has not yet come.” (John 2:4)

And also

When Jesus from the cross saw his mother, and the disciple whom he loved standing by her, he said to his mother, “Woman, behold your son!” Then he said to the disciple, “Behold your mother!” (John 19:25, 26, 27)

The one occasion on which he did not acknowledge her is in Luke:

They announced to Jesus, “Your mother and your brothers are standing outside and want to see you.” Jesus answered and said to them, “My mother and my brothers are these who hear the Word of God and do it.” (Luke 8:20, 21; Matthew 12:46–49; Mark 3:31–35)

In other passages Mary is called his mother, but never from his own mouth.

There is further support for this in the fact that he did not acknowledge himself to be the son of David. In fact, we read in the Gospels,

Jesus asked the Pharisees, saying, “What is your view of the Christ? Whose son is he?” They said to him, “David’s.” He said to them, “So how is it that David, in the spirit, calls him his Lord when he says, ‘The Lord said to my Lord, “Sit at my right until I make your enemies a stool for your feet”’? So if David calls him ‘Lord,’ how is he his son?” And no one could answer him a word. (Matthew 22:41–46; Mark 12:35, 36, 37; Luke 20:41–44; Psalms 110:1)

We can see from all this that as far as his glorified human nature was concerned, the Lord was neither the son of Mary nor the son of David.

He showed Peter, James, and John what his glorified human nature was like when he was transfigured before their eyes: His face shone like the sun and his clothing was like light. And then a voice from a cloud said, “This is my beloved Son, in whom I am well pleased. Hear him.” (Matthew 17:1–8; Mark 9:2–8; Luke 9:28–36)

The Lord also looked to John “like the sun shining in its strength” (Revelation 1:16).

We are assured that the Lord’s human nature was glorified by what it says about his glorification in the Gospels, such as the following from John:

The hour has come for the Son of Humanity to be glorified. He said, “Father, glorify your name.” A voice came from heaven, saying, “I both have glorified it and will glorify it again.” (John 12:23, 28)

It says “I both have glorified it and will glorify it again” because the Lord was glorified step by step. Again,

After Judas went out, Jesus said, “Now the Son of Humanity is glorified, and God is glorified in him. God will also glorify him in himself and glorify him immediately.” (John 13:31, 32)

Again,

Jesus said, “Father, the hour has come. Glorify your Son, so that your Son may also glorify you.” (John 17:1, 5)

And in Luke,

Was it not necessary for the Christ to suffer this and enter into his glory? (Luke 24:26)

These things were said about his human nature.

The Lord said, “God is glorified in him” and also “God will glorify him in himself” and “Glorify your Son, so that your Son may also glorify you.” The Lord said these things because the union was reciprocal, the divine nature with the human nature and the human nature with the divine. That is why he also said, “I am in the Father and the Father is in me” (John 14:10, 11) and “All that is mine is yours, and all that is yours is mine” (John 17:10); so the union was full.

It is the same with any union. Unless it is reciprocal, it is not full. This is what the union of the Lord with us and of us with the Lord must be like, as he tells us in this passage in John:

On that day you will know that you are in me and I am in you. (John 14:20)

And in this passage:

Abide in me, and I [will abide] in you. Those who abide in me and in whom I abide bear much fruit. (John 15:4, 5)

Because the Lord’s human nature was glorified—that is, made divine—on the third day after his death he rose again with his whole body, which is not true of any human being, since we rise again with our spirit only and not with our body.

So that we should know this, and so that no one should doubt that the Lord rose again with his whole body, he not only said so through the angels who were in the tomb but also showed himself to the disciples in his human form with his body, saying to them when they thought they were seeing a spirit,

“See my hands and my feet—that it is I myself. Touch me and see, because a spirit does not have flesh and bones as you see I have.” And when he had said this, he showed them his hands and his feet. (Luke 24:39, 40; John 20:20)

And again,

Jesus said to Thomas, “Reach your finger here, and look at my hands; and reach out your hand and put it into my side; and do not be unbelieving, but believing.” Then Thomas said, “My Lord and my God.” (John 20:27, 28)

To make it even clearer that he was not a spirit but a person, he said to the disciples,

“Have you any food here?” They gave him a piece of broiled fish and some honeycomb, and he took it and ate in their presence. (Luke 24:41, 42, 43)

Since his body was no longer material but had become divine substance, he came to the disciples when the doors were closed (John 20:19, 26) and disappeared after they had seen him (Luke 24:31).

Once the Lord was in this state, he was carried up and sat down at the right hand of God, for it says in Luke,

It happened that, while Jesus blessed his disciples, he was parted from them and carried up into heaven. (Luke 24:51)

and in Mark,

After he had spoken to them, he was carried up into heaven and sat down at the right hand of God. (Mark 16:19)

Sitting down at the right hand of God means gaining divine omnipotence.

Since the Lord rose into heaven with his divine and human natures united into one and sat at the right hand of God (which means gaining omnipotence), it follows that his human substance or essence is now just like his divine substance or essence.

To think otherwise would be like thinking that his divine nature was raised into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, but not together with his human nature. This is contrary to Scripture and also contrary to the Christian teaching that in Christ God and a human being are like the soul and the body. To separate them is also contrary to sound reason.

It is this union of the Father with the Son, or of the divine nature with the human nature, that is meant in the following passages:

I came forth from the Father and have come into the world. Again, I leave the world and go to the Father. (John 16:28)

I go (or come) to the one who sent me. (John 7:33; 16:5, 16; 17:11, 13; 20:17)

What then if you were to see the Son of Humanity ascend where he was before? (John 6:62)

No one has ascended to heaven except the one who came down from heaven. (John 3:13)

Every one of us who is saved ascends to heaven, though not on our own, but rather through the Lord’s power. Only the Lord ascended on his own.

from The Lord, Section 35

6. Step by step he took off the human nature he had taken on from his mother and put on a human nature from what was divine within him, which is the divine human nature and the Son of God.

It is generally known that the Lord was divine and human, divine because of Jehovah the Father and human because of the Virgin Mary. That is why he was God and a human being and therefore had a divine essence and a human outward nature, the divine essence from his Father and the human nature from his mother. This meant that he was equal to the Father with respect to his divinity, but less than the Father with respect to his humanity. It also meant that, as we are taught by the so-called Athanasian statement of faith, this human nature from his mother was not changed into or mixed with a divine essence, since a human nature cannot be changed into or mixed with a divine essence.

All the same, this very statement of faith we have accepted says that the divine nature took on a human nature—that is, united itself with it as a soul with its body, so much so that they were not two but one person. It follows from this that he took off the human nature received from his mother, which was essentially like that of anyone else and therefore material, and put on a human nature from his Father, which was essentially like his divine nature and therefore substantial, thus making his human nature divine.

That is why the Lord is even called “Jehovah” and “God” in the prophetic books of the Word, and in the Word of the Gospels is called “Lord,” “God,” “Messiah” or “Christ,” and “the Son of God,” the one in whom we are to believe and by whom we are to be saved.

Now, since from the beginning the Lord had a human nature from his mother and took this off step by step, while he was in this world he therefore experienced two states, one called the state of being brought low or being emptied out and one called the state of being glorified or united with the Divine called “the Father.” The state of being brought low occurred when and to the extent that he was primarily conscious of the human nature received from his mother, and the state of being glorified occurred when and to the extent that he was primarily conscious of the human nature received from his Father.

In his state of being brought low he prayed to the Father as someone other than himself; while in his state of being glorified he talked with the Father as if talking with himself. In this latter state he said that the Father was in him and he in the Father and that the Father and he were one; while in his state of being brought low he bore trials, suffered on the cross, and prayed that the Father would not forsake him.This is because his divine nature could not be subject to any trial, let alone suffer on the cross.

These passages then show us that by means of his trials and the subsequent constant victories, and by means of his suffering on the cross, which was the final trial, he completely subdued the hells and completely glorified his human nature, as has been explained above.

From The Lord, Section 35

5. The complete union of the divine nature and the human nature in him was effected by the suffering on the cross, which was his last trial.

Support for this proposition was provided above [Sections 12–14], in the chapter explaining that the Lord came into the world to subdue the hells and to glorify his human nature, and that the suffering on the cross was the last battle, by which he gained complete victory over the hells and completely glorified his human nature. Since, then, by suffering on the cross the Lord completely glorified his human nature—that is, united it to the divine nature—and thereby made his human nature divine as well, it follows that he is Jehovah and God in respect to both natures.

That is why in so many passages in the Word Jehovah, God, or the Holy One of Israel is called the Redeemer, the Savior, or the Maker, as in the following:

Mary said, “My soul magnifies the Lord, and my spirit has rejoiced in God, my Savior.” (Luke 1:46, 47)

The angel said to the shepherds, “Behold, I am bringing you good news, a great joy, which will be for all people. There is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord.” (Luke 2:10, 11)

They said, “This is truly the Savior of the world, the Christ.” (John 4:42)

I, Jehovah God, am helping you; your Redeemer is the Holy One of Israel. (Isaiah 41:14)

Thus says Jehovah, who is your Creator, O Jacob, and your Maker, O Israel: “I have redeemed you. I am Jehovah your God, the Holy One of Israel, your Savior.” (Isaiah 43:1, 3)

Thus says Jehovah your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel, “I am Jehovah, your Holy One, the Creator of Israel, your King.” (Isaiah 43:14, 15)

Thus says Jehovah, the Holy One of Israel, and Israel’s Maker. (Isaiah 45:11)

Thus says Jehovah your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel. (Isaiah 48:17)

. . . so that all flesh may know that I, Jehovah, am your Savior, and your Redeemer, the Mighty One of Jacob. (Isaiah 49:26)

Then he will come to Zion as the Redeemer. (Isaiah 59:20)

. . . so that you may know that I, Jehovah, am your Savior and your Redeemer, the Powerful One of Jacob. (Isaiah 60:16)

Jehovah, the one who formed you from the womb. (Isaiah 49:5)

. . . Jehovah, my Rock and my Redeemer. (Psalms 19:14)

They remembered that God was their Rock, and God on High their Redeemer. (Psalms 78:35)

Thus says Jehovah your Maker, and the one who formed you from the womb. (Isaiah 44:2)

As for our Redeemer, Jehovah Sabaoth is his name, the Holy One of Israel. (Isaiah 47:4)

“With everlasting compassion I will have mercy on you,” says Jehovah, your Redeemer. (Isaiah 54:8)

Their Redeemer is strong; Jehovah is his name. (Jeremiah 50:34)

Let Israel hope in Jehovah, because with Jehovah there is mercy; with him there is abundant redemption. He will redeem Israel from all his iniquities. (Psalms 130:7, 8)

Jehovah God is my rock, my fortress, the horn of my salvation, my Savior. (2 Samuel 22:2, 3)

Thus says Jehovah, the Redeemer of Israel, Israel’s Holy One: “Monarchs will see and abide, because of Jehovah, who is faithful, the Holy One of Israel, who has chosen you.” (Isaiah 49:7)

God is only among you, and there is no other God. Surely you are a hidden God, O God of Israel, the Savior. (Isaiah 45:14, 15)

Thus says Jehovah the King of Israel, and Israel’s Redeemer, Jehovah Sabaoth: “There is no God other than me.” (Isaiah 44:6)

I am Jehovah, and there is no Savior other than me. (Isaiah 43:11)

Am I not Jehovah? And there is no [God] other than me; and there is no Savior other than me. (Isaiah 45:21)

I am Jehovah your God. You are to acknowledge no God other than me; there is no Savior other than me. (Hosea 13:4)

Am I not Jehovah? And there is no God other than me. I am a just God, and there is no Savior other than me. Look to me so that you may be saved, all you ends of the earth, because I am God and there is no other. (Isaiah 45:21, 22)

Jehovah Sabaoth is his name, and your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel. He will be called the God of the whole earth. (Isaiah 54:5)

We can see from these passages that the Lord’s divine nature called “the Father” (and here called “Jehovah” and “God”) and his divine human nature called “the Son” (and here “the Redeemer” and “the Savior” as well as “the Maker,” meaning the Reformer and Regenerator) are one, not two, for it not only says “Jehovah is God” and “the Holy One of Israel is the Redeemer and Savior,” it also says “Jehovah is the Redeemer and Savior.” Not only that, it even calls Jehovah “the Savior” and says, “there is no Savior other than me.” This clearly shows that the divine nature and the human nature in the Lord are one person and that the human nature is divine as well, since the Redeemer and Savior of the world is no other than the Lord in his divine human nature, which is called “the Son.” Redemption and salvation are properly credited to his human nature, and are called “merit and righteousness,” since his human nature bore the trials and the suffering on the cross, which means that he accomplished redemption and salvation by means of his human nature.

Since, then, after the union of his human nature with his inner divine nature, which was like that of soul and body in us, they were no longer two but were one person (according to the teaching of the Christian world), the Lord was Jehovah and God in both respects. This is why some passages speak of “Jehovah” and “the Holy One of Israel the Redeemer and Savior,” but others say “Jehovah is the Redeemer and Savior,” as you can see from the citations above.

For Christ being called the Savior, see Luke 2:10, 11 and John 4:42. On God and the God of Israel being the Savior and Redeemer, see Luke 1:47; Isaiah 45:14; 54:5; Psalms 78:35. On Jehovah, the Holy One of Israel being the Savior and Redeemer, see Isaiah 41:14; 43:3, 11, 14, 15; 48:17; 49:7; 54:5. On Jehovah being the Savior, Redeemer, and Maker, see Isaiah 44:6; 47:4; 49:26; 54:8; 63:8; Jeremiah 50:34; Psalms 19:14; 130:7, 8. On Jehovah God being the Redeemer and Savior, “and there is no Savior other than me,” see Isaiah 43:11; 44:6; 45:14, 18, 21, 22; Hosea 13:4.

from The Lord, Section 34

Notes:

Sections 12-14: Published 3/1/2018-3/2/2018

4. The Lord made his human nature divine by the trials to which he made himself vulnerable and by then constantly being victorious.

This was discussed in Sections 12–14 above. I need add only the following.

Trials are battles against what is evil and false, and since what is evil and false comes from hell, they are also battles against hell. For us too, when we are subjected to spiritual trials, it is evil spirits from hell who are inflicting them. We are not aware that evil spirits are behind the trials, but an abundance of experience has taught me that they are.

This is why we are rescued from hell and raised into heaven when the Lord enables us to be victorious in our trials. This is how we become spiritual individuals by means of our trials or battles against our evils—how we therefore become angels.

The Lord, though, fought against all the hells with his own power and completely tamed and subdued them; and by doing so, since at the same time he glorified his human nature, he keeps them tamed and subdued to eternity.

Before the Lord’s Coming the hells had risen so far that they were beginning to trouble even angels of heaven, and with them, everyone who was entering the world and leaving the world. The reason for this rise of the hells was that the church was in utter ruins, and the people of our world were wholly devoted to evil and falsity because of their idolatrous practices; and it is people on earth who make up hell. That is why no one could have been saved if the Lord had not come into the world.

There is a great deal in the Psalms of David and the prophets about these battles of the Lord, but little in the Gospels. These battles are what we refer to as the trials that the Lord underwent, the last being his suffering on the cross.

This is why the Lord is called the Savior and Redeemer. The church is sufficiently aware of this to say that the Lord conquered death or the Devil (that is, hell) and that he rose from death victorious, as well as that there is no salvation apart from the Lord. We shall see shortly that he also glorified his human nature and in this way became the Savior, Redeemer, Reformer, and Regenerator to eternity.

We can see from the ample supply of passages cited in Sections 12–14 above that the Lord became our Savior by means of battles or trials; and there is also this from Isaiah:

“The day of vengeance is in my heart and the year of my redeemed has arrived. I have trodden them in my wrath; I have driven their victory down into the earth.” Therefore he became their Savior. (Isaiah 63:4, 6, 8)

This chapter is about the Lord’s battles. There is also this in David:

Lift your heads, gates! Be raised up, doors of the world, so that the King of Glory may come in! Who is this King of Glory? Jehovah, strong and heroic, Jehovah, a hero in war. (Psalms 24:7, 8)

This too is about the Lord.

from The Lord, Section 33

Notes:

Sections 12-14: Published 3/1/2018-3/2/2018

3. The Lord made the human nature divine from the divine nature within himself.

There is support for this in many passages in the Word. Here we select passages that support the following points.

a. This happened step by step:

Jesus grew and became strong in spirit and in wisdom, and the grace of God was upon him. (Luke 2:40)

Jesus increased in wisdom and age, and in favor with God and humankind. (Luke 2:52)

b. The divine nature worked through the human nature the way a soul works through its body:

The Son cannot do anything on his own unless he sees the Father doing it. (John 5:19)

I do nothing of myself; as my Father taught me I say these things. The one who sent me is with me; he has not left me alone. (John 8:28, 29; 5:30)

I have not spoken on my own authority; the Father who sent me has given me a commandment regarding what I should say and what I should speak. (John 12:49, 50)

The words that I speak to you I do not speak on my own authority; the Father who dwells in me does these works. (John 14:10)

I am not alone, because the Father is with me. (John 16:32)

c. The divine nature and the human nature worked in complete accord:

Whatever the Father does, the Son also does in the same way. (John 5:19)

Just as the Father raises the dead and brings them to life, so also the Son brings to life those whom he wishes to. (John 5:21)

Just as the Father has life in himself, so he has also granted the Son to have life in himself. (John 5:26)

Now they know that all things you have given me are from you. (John 17:7)

d. The divine nature was united to the human nature and the human nature to the divine:

“If you have known me you have also known my Father and have seen him.” When Philip wanted to see the Father, Jesus said, “Have I been with you for so long, and yet you have not known me, Philip? Those who have seen me have seen the Father. Do you not believe that I am in the Father and the Father is in me? Believe me that I am in the Father and the Father is in me.” (John 14:7–11)

If I am not doing the works of my Father, do not believe me. If I am doing them, believe the works, so that you may know and believe that the Father is in me and I am in the Father. (John 10:37, 38)

. . . so that they all may be one, as you, Father, are in me and I am in you. (John 17:21)

On that day you will know that I am in my Father. (John 14:20)

No one will snatch the sheep from my Father’s hand. I and the Father are one. (John 10:29, 30)

The Father loves the Son and has given all things into his hand. (John 3:35)

All things that the Father has are mine. (John 16:15)

All that is mine is yours, and all that is yours is mine. (John 17:10)

You have given the Son power over all flesh. (John 17:2)

All power has been given to me in heaven and on earth. (Matthew 28:18)

e. We should turn to the Divine-Human One, as we can see from the following passages:

. . . so that all people will honor the Son just as they honor the Father. (John 5:23)

If you had known me, you would also have known my Father. (John 8:19)

Those who see me see the one who sent me. (John 12:45)

If you have known me you have also known my Father, and from now on you know him and have seen him. (John 14:7)

Those who accept me accept the one who sent me. (John 13:20)

This is because no one can see the divinity itself that is called “the Father”; only the Divine-Human One can be seen. The Lord in fact said,

No one has ever seen God. The only-begotten Son, who is close to the Father’s heart, has made him visible. (John 1:18)

No one has seen the Father except the one who is with the Father. He has seen the Father. (John 6:46)

You have never heard the Father’s voice or seen what he looks like. (John 5:37)

f. Since the Lord made his human nature divine from the divine nature within himself, and since we should turn to him and he is the Son of God, we are therefore to believe in the Lord who is both Father and Son, as we can see from the following passages.

Jesus said that as many as accepted him, he gave them power to become children of God and believe in his name. (John 1:12)

. . . so that all who believe in him will not perish but will have eternal life. (John 3:15)

God loved the world so much that he gave his only-begotten Son so that everyone who believes in him would have eternal life. (John 3:16)

Those who believe in the Son are not condemned; but those who do not believe have already been condemned because they have not believed in the name of the only-begotten Son of God. (John 3:18)

Those who believe in the Son have eternal life. Those who do not believe in the Son will not see life; instead, the wrath of God abides on them. (John 3:36)

The bread of God is the one who comes down from heaven and gives life to the world. Those who come to me will not hunger, and those who believe in me will never thirst. (John 6:33, 35)

This is the will of the one who sent me, that all those who see the Son and believe in him will have eternal life, and I will raise them up on the last day. (John 6:40)

They said to Jesus, “What should we do in order to perform the works of God?” Jesus answered, “This is the work of God, that you believe in the one whom he has sent.” (John 6:28, 29)

Truly I say to you, those who believe in me have eternal life. (John 6:47)

Jesus cried out, saying, “If any are thirsty, they must come to me and drink. As the Scripture has said, from the bellies of those who believe in me will flow rivers of living water.” (John 7:37, 38)

If you do not believe that I am, you will die in your sins. (John 8:24)

Jesus said, “I am the resurrection and the life. Even if they die, those who believe in me will live; and anyone who lives and believes in me will never die.” (John 11:25, 26)

Jesus said, “I have come into the world as a light so that anyone who believes in me will not remain in darkness.” (John 12:46; 8:12)

While you have the light, believe in the light, so that you may become children of the light. (John 12:36)

I tell you truly, the dead will hear the voice of the Son of God, and those who hear will live. (John 5:25)

Abide in me, and I [will abide] in you. I am the vine; you are the branches. Those who abide in me and in whom I abide bear much fruit, because without me you cannot do anything. (John 15:1–5)

They were to abide in the Lord, and the Lord in them. (John 14:20; 17:23)

I am the way, the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me. (John 14:6)

In these passages and all others, when it mentions “the Father” it means the divine nature that was in the Lord from his conception, which—according to the teaching embraced by the Christian world regarding faith—was like the soul within the body in human beings. The human nature that came from this divine nature is the Son of God.

Now, since this was also made divine, in order to prevent people from turning to the Father alone and thereby separating the Father from the Lord (in whom the Father dwells) in their thought, faith, and worship, the Lord went on to teach that the Father and he are one and that the Father is in him and he is in the Father, and that we are to abide in him; also that no one comes to the Father except through him. He also tells us that we are to believe in him and that we are saved by a faith focused directly on him.

For many Christians, it is impossible to grasp the concept that in the Lord a human nature was made divine, primarily because they think of “human” only in terms of the physical body and not in terms of anything spiritual. Yet all angels, who are spiritual beings, also have a completely human form, and everything divine that emanates from Jehovah God, everything from its first [or innermost] level in heaven to its last [or outermost] level on earth, tends to take on a human form.

On angels as human forms and on everything divine tending toward the human form, see Heaven and Hell 73–77 and 453–460. There will also be more on this subject in forthcoming works that will draw on angelic wisdom about the Lord.

from The Lord, Section 32

Notes:

from Heaven and Hell:

Sections 73-77: Published 3/9/2018-3/10/2018

Sections 453-460: Published 5/16/2017-5/21/2017

2. The Lord from eternity, or Jehovah, took on a human nature for the purpose of saving us.

There is support for this from the Word in the preceding parts of this book. It will be said elsewhere that otherwise we could not have been saved.

There are many passages in the Word that show that he took on a human nature, places where it says that he came forth from God, came down from heaven, and was sent into the world. See the following, for example:

I came forth from the Father and have come into the world. (John 16:28)

I proceeded forth and came from God. I have not come of myself; he sent me. (John 8:42)

The Father loves you because you have believed that I came forth from God. (John 16:27)

No one has ascended to heaven except the one who came down from heaven. (John 3:13)

The bread of God is the one who comes down from heaven and gives life to the world. (John 6:33, 35, 41, 50, 51)

The one who comes down from above is above all. The one who comes down from heaven is above all. (John 3:31)

I know the Father because I am from him and he sent me. (John 7:29)

You may see in Section 20 above that being sent into the world by the Father means taking on a human nature.

from The Lord, Section 31

Notes:

Section 20: Published 3/12 2018

1. The Lord from eternity is Jehovah.

This we know from the Word, since the Lord said to the Jews,

Truly I say to you, before Abraham was, I am. (John 8:58)

And again,

Glorify me, Father, with the glory I had with you before the world existed. (John 17:5)

This means the Lord from eternity and not the Son from eternity, because the Son is his human nature conceived by Jehovah the Father and born by the Virgin Mary in time, as explained above [Sections 19–20].

We are assured by many passages in the Word that the Lord from eternity is Jehovah himself, a few of which passages may be cited now.

It will be said on that day, “This is our God; we have waited for him to free us. [This is] Jehovah; we have waited for him. Let us rejoice and be glad in his salvation.” (Isaiah 25:9)

We can see from this that the speakers were waiting for Jehovah God himself.

A voice of someone in the wilderness crying out, “Prepare a pathway for Jehovah; make level in the desert a highway for our God. The glory of Jehovah will be revealed, and all flesh will see it together. Behold, the Lord Jehovih is coming in strength.” (Isaiah 40:3, 5, 10; Matthew 3:3; Mark 1:3; Luke 3:4)

Here too, the Lord, who is to come, is called Jehovah.

I am Jehovah. I will make you a covenant for the people, a light for the nations. I am Jehovah. This is my name, and I will not give my glory to another. (Isaiah 42:6, 7, 8)

A covenant for the people and a light for the nations is the Lord in his human nature. Because this is from Jehovah and was made one with Jehovah, it says “I am Jehovah. This is my name, and I will not give my glory to another”—that is, to no one other than himself. To give glory is to glorify, or to unite with himself.

The Lord, whom you seek, will suddenly come to his Temple. (Malachi 3:1)

The Temple means the temple of his body, as he says in John 2:19, 21.

The Dayspring from on high has visited us. (Luke 1:78)

The Dayspring from on high is Jehovah, or the Lord from eternity.

We can see from these passages that “the Lord from eternity” means his divine nature as the source, which is called Jehovah in the Word. We will see from passages to be cited below that after his human nature had been glorified, both “the Lord” and “Jehovah” mean the divine nature and the human nature together as one, and that “the Son” by itself means the divine human nature.

from The Lord, Section 30

Notes:

Sections 19-20: Published 3/11/2018-3/12/2018